Tribalism is making this the most demoralizing General Election.

 

I wish I could have more hope with the upcoming General Election, Jeremy Corbyn is by far the most exciting leader in my lifetime, and although this should fill me with the  same giddy excitement of a One Direction fan winning a VIP tour to Harry Styles’s dressing room, I feel utterly demoralized. For the older generation, replace One Direction with Take That and Harry Styles with Gary Barlow. For my Labour friends in my constituency, replace One Direction with the Beatles, and Harry Styles with Paul Mccartney. 

Why should I feel gutted at the prospect of a General Election with one of the best leaders in my lifetime taking part? Because for the first time since joining the Labour party, my militant marching orders are to support Labour without a shred of critique, or a measure of cynicism. Do the Lib-Dems have any good ideas? No, no matter what policy they have, they are traitors, yellow Tories with no heart and a blood thirsty attitude towards poor people. How about the Greens, surely their lefty policies rub the right way with Labour supporters? Absolutely not, the Greens are crazy crusties with no hope of any power, and Caroline Lucas should really support Labour because we are right and she is wrong. This is literally the level we are at now. Corbyn’s hopeful “inclusive” politics, seems to only be inclusive if you’re part of Labour, otherwise you belong in Theresa May’s basement, eating the leftover crumbs of stolen primary school meals.

I grew up with Liberal Democrat parents, my mother as a councillor, and my father who is pretty much part of the woodwork which make up the foundations of the party. They worked closely with Paddy Ashdown during the Liberal Democrat renaissance of the 1990’s. My sister, a passionate scientist fighting for the environment, and tackling climate change, has worked with Caroline Lucas of the Greens. My mother and I have joined Labour, and are passionate about Jeremy Corbyn and his policies. If you heard any of us discuss politics around the dinner table, our differences in opinion are very subtle, nuanced and specific. We are all polar opposites to UKIP and the Conservative party. As are the parties actually policies if anyone bothers to actually check.

Here’s a few examples borrowed from each manifesto.

  NHS

Labour:

  “We will end health service privatisation and bring services into a secure, publicly-provided NHS. We will integrate the NHS and social care for older and disabled people, funding dignity across the board and ensure parity for mental health services.”

 

Lib-dems:

 “The Liberal Democrats will put an end to these sweetheart deals, block PFI contracts, prevent privatisation of the NHS through the back door and increase NHS funding each year”

We need services that fit around people’s lives, not ones that force them to fit their lives around the care they need. We must move away from a fragmented system to an integrated service with more joined-up care.

 

Greens:

  We will fight for a fair deal for those needing health care by opposing cuts, closures and privatisation and by demanding a full programme of locally accessible services.In particular, we will maintain the principle of a free NHS by implementing in England and Wales the scheme that provides free social care to the elderly in Scotland.

All these parties support the reinstatement of nurse’s bursaries.

So not much difference here, maybe some nuanced differences on funding, but essentially the same goal compare to the Tories; who want more privatisation, social care paid for by forcing people to sell their houses, along with UKIP who believe the NHS is a monolithic hangover of days gone by.

Then we look at domestic politics. Many lefty media outlets praised Labour’s manifesto as Keynesian, I wonder if they and Liberals understand that John Maynard Keynes was actually a Liberal? That investing in an economy in recession is how you grow the economy, rather than floating it on credit card debt? Well the Liberals have now clarified they would boost the economy with a major program of capital investment aimed at stimulating growth across the UK; Labour will take advantage of near- record low interest rates to create a National Transformation Fund that will invest £250 billion over ten years in upgrading our economy; and the Greens have stated “With scant evidence of the kind of strong recovery expected after previous post-war recessions, it’s time to admit that austerity in the UK has failed and that an alternative approach of significant investment to reduce the deficit is needed”

Obviously there are differences in how you invest in the economy between the progressive parties, but compare that to the Conservatives who are tripling private debt, decimating public services, and ramping up privatization in every corner of the country; why split each others votes in this election because of such trivial differences?

The Conservatives won just 24.3% of the population over last general election, why the hell do they deserve any kind of majority? If all the progressive parties had allied last election, they would have received 49% of the national vote. There is no guarantee that voters would switch, but why shouldn’t they? Considering the damage to the country done by this current slim Tory majority? And voters won’t switch on mass unless their supported party leads them that way.

What are the real dividing lines that stop a progressive alliance? For the Lib-Dems, it’s Labour’s position on Europe. Ironically for many in the Labour party the dividing lines in supporting Corbyn is his position on Europe. Personally, I’m immensely disappointed by Labour’s policy to accept Brexit for what it is, and given that Labour supporters voted 65% to remain, a significant majority in the party must, at some level, be feeling the same resentment. Tactically it hasn’t paid off either,  losing a lot of Remain voters to other parties, and lots of Leave voters to the Conservatives. So what’s the point in pretending Labour want to accept the Brexit result, when it’s neither honest nor tactically useful. At least in a progressive alliance, many in the Labour party would feel quite comfortable compromising for another vote on a Brexit deal, or at least staying in the Single Market.

For us in Labour, I would press the Liberals to fully endorse an anti-austerity program. From my experience Liberals are far more radical than the public notice, it’s always the hierarchy who caution patience, a cowardly tactical ploy to always appear in a mythical center ground, defining themselves from the other parties instead of focusing on their own beliefs. I cannot understand why re-nationalizing natural monopolies is not just a socialist ideal, but always a liberal one? You cannot empower people without taking them out of poverty either, so the Liberals should be far more on board with an anti-austerity program. Again if Labour compromised on Europe, something the party naturally wants, surely the Liberals can compromise by backing up a strong investment package? Which the party naturally wants!?

Now for many politically active, pro-European, Liberal Lefties, such as myself, I feel completely at odds and impotent In doing anything in this election. This tribalism is completely toxic for all people involved. Politics should be about values, policies, principles and morals, It shouldn’t be treated as religious, as many left of the Conservatives are doing now. Yes Corbyn is fantastic, but so is Caroline Lucas, and Farron’s defense of internationalism, refugees and civil rights, is equally inspiring. Nicola Sturgeon is also one of the biggest thorns in the current Conservative government . I see all these people as great politicians, but I must only support one, otherwise I’m a traitor to my cause. Not because I am against the policies, but because I don’t don my red rosette and demonize all the other progressive political parties simply because they are not Labour.

If you are truly inclusive, accepting of diversity, and passionately democratic, you cannot put all your hopes for a progressive future in one party. Under Blair, Cameron and May, every MP received their marching orders. You do as your told, or face sitting on the backbenches for the rest of your term. How can you defend a system which is effectively a democratic dictatorship? At least in coalition, people had to work to convince each other to vote for policies. You didn’t just have to turn up, vote with the whip, claim your expenses and salary, then go home again. Bearing in mind that over two thirds of European countries have proportional systems and continuous coalitions, and a reminder for the socialists in this country, that Corbyn’s type of politics is most prevalent  in European countries where there is proportional voting.

It’s far too late to ask candidates to withdraw, or have open talks with other parties. I ask as a passionate Labour supporter, to understand that by simply being in the Labour party doesn’t qualify you as morally superior, or politically more competent. That other progressive parties care as much about fixing social injustice and inequality as we do, with slightly different solutions to how to solve It. We can’t change what will happen this general election, but unless by some miracle we beat the Conservatives, we have to grow out of this primitive tribal politics, acknowledge the elephant in the room, and do something about the voting system if you care about the future of this country.

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We’re stuck in the Land of Brexit Blues. We need more than ever for Labour to gain a brain, the Lib-Dems to gain courage, and moderate Conservatives to gain a heart.

Post referendum, we’re stuck in the Land of Brexit Blues. Now more than ever we need moderate Conservatives to gain a heart, Labour to gain a brain and the Lib-Dems to gain some Courage, if we are to get out of the tornado that bought us here.

As 2016 comes to a close, I’m sure we can all agree, we’re in need of some respite and mind-numbing quantities of fattening food and alcohol, before the horrible day comes when we finally start the process of leaving the European Union; a bit like prison inmates being given whatever dish they like, before sitting in an electric chair. As I write this, and I can hear the whispered murmurs of Daily Express readers,“Remoaner, talking the country down!!”. Well whatever way you spin it, the economic and social development prospects of this country look about as appetizing as cat sick. Let’s look at the facts:
Drop in value of the pound wiped 1.5 trillion – yes trillion – pounds off of house hold income in the UK. Households in Turkey and Columbia fared better than we did.
http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/investing/article-3979306/Investors-struggle-grasp-effect-pound-s-fall-Brexit.html, investment

Investment of up to £65 Billion has been abandoned by local and foreign companies
http://news.sky.com/story/business-investments-worth-163655bn-abandoned-after-brexit-vote-10657282

A significant rise in race hate crime, up by 41% since the referendum.
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/crime/brexit-hate-crimes-racism-eu-referendum-vote-attacks-increase-police-figures-official-a7358866.html

So off to the land of Brexit Blues we go, the good news is we managed to kill one wicked character on arrival; Mr Farage is now politically irrelevant, and after bemoaning foreign politicians taking part in the Brexit referendum, has taken it upon himself to make speeches for Donald Trump and be his diplomatic adviser. A note for the Americans, you’re welcome too him!

Now we take the first steps on the yellow brick road towards the Emerald city of the new Tory cabinet, whereupon we meet the mystic wizard, or in this case Boris Johnson our foreign secretary; who states he has a great plan for getting out of this Brexit situation, we’re just not allowed to know yet, and we should just trust him and his merry band of idiots for leading us on this path in the first place. In the story of the Wizard of Oz, the wizard turns out to be a fraud, just a simple old man. Well in this case Boris Johnson has definitely been not only a fraud, but a colossal buffoon who has endangered this country, simply to become the leader of the losing side in Brexit, and become Prime Minister. Boris has always been a life-long supporter of the EU, who saw a political chance, gambling with the future of our country, and is now busy insulting his way through every country he visits.

Back to our story, and our destiny as a county, first we need to topple the Wicked Witch of the West (Theresa May) who plots to steal our various worker’s rights.

https://www.theguardian.com/law/2016/nov/07/doubts-cast-on-theresa-mays-pledge-to-protect-workers-rights-post-brexit

Sadly there is no bucket of water to melt this witch in real life, we’ve already lost our privacy freedom with the Snoopers Charter, and post Article 50, be fully ready to lose further freedoms and human rights. Not only does Theresa May believe in watching our every move, cataloging internet browser history, but she has always wanted to deport foreigners to countries where they could be killed and tortured; Priti Patel (Secretary of State for International Development) wants to bring back hanging, and other forms of capital punishment; Liz Truss (Justice secretary) wants to restrict legal aid; Christ Grayling (Transport Secretary) wants a ban on giving prisoners books ( which has since been deemed unlawful by the High Court), Cut legal aid (by up to 30% in some cases, which led to the first ever barristers’ strike), Introduce a flat-fee court charge and back the choice of bed and breakfast owners to refuse gay couple patron. The rest of the party are dangerously worse.

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/jun/05/snoopers-charter-most-britons-unaware-tory-plans

With the far right holding the reins of the Tory party, the Conservatives continuously fearful of the UKIP threat and their compatriots on the Tory back-benchers, it’s time for moderates and the left to stop fighting each other, and sail us out of this Brexit mess.

Labour under Corbyn – the Tinman – need to start acting sensibly, they need to gain a brain. I’m extremely fond of Jeremy Corbyn, his unequivocal political philosophy is the most refreshing touch to politics I’ve seen for decades. The issue is that flat-out honesty is a very difficult position to take when you’re trying to win a general election. If you actually look at his policies they are very popular among-st the general public:

  • Increased funding for the NHS
  • Higher education grants
  • Re-nationalization of the public services
  • Building social housing
  • Rent caps
  • Increased tax on the wealthy, as well as challenging tax evasion.
  • Protection of human rights
  • Environmental business funding

Only 13% of the population believe austerity is a good idea, supporting the cuts; 22% believe that cuts should continue at a slower rate, and 45% believe directly in the policies of Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour, even if they don’t support the party.

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/jeremy-corbyn-media-policies-labour_uk_57fe651be4b0010a7f3da76b

So why is Labour so low in the polls?

An Independent investigation found that 75% of media sources in the UK are deliberately biased against Jeremy Corbyn. They rarely focus on anything of substance, more about how many gaffs they can find in a simply out-and-out, vehement, character assassination campaign. His passion for helping vulnerable people can also be a barrier to votes, with the general public having a fairly right wing approach to welfare, immigration and criminal punishment. Again a symptom of the rampant and deliberately dishonest right wing media; how many stories in the Daily Mail start with “ Benefit claimant with 8 kids has mansion” or some other crap.

But this isn’t why I think Corbyn’s Labour need to gain a brain; I simply want Corbyn’s team to recognize the need for a smarter dialogue with the media, and the general public. The team devoted to spin in his office consistently get this wrong; who can forget when Corbyn sat down on a train, because he couldn’t find a seat, not that he was lying, but the media then developed multiple stories discrediting, and in very few cases supporting, his integrity and honesty, and everyone missed the point he was making about re-nationalizing transport.

When talking about foreign dictators like Castro, despite the good work Castro did redistributing wealth, providing healthcare and education, he did brutally murder his opponents. Corbyn called murder his flaws as a dictator. Now if he HAS to have an opinion that he can’t help but tell the media, given the tendency of the media to conflate Corbyn as a communist, couldn’t he have led with “Castro was a dictator who is guilty of murdering his opponents” rather than open himself up to media scrutiny?

Now over Brexit, the only time they try to hide their true feelings – which are pro-European – to behave tactically ambivalent, they fundamentally get their strategy wrong. For one thing opinion has actually changed in this country over the Brexit referendum. 7% of the Leave vote regret their voting choice, and that number is getting bigger every day, as well as the number of young people now eligible to vote, if we were to run the referendum again – maybe with an honest campaign from LeaveEU this time – we would see at least 56% of the country voting to remain.

I’m not saying Labour need to come out and say we should hold another referendum, unfortunately that would be electoral suicide, but to comprehensively say “we need to stay in the Single Market” would be a good start. Something Corbyn and Mcdonnell haven’t been able to do.

Now the Scarecrow who needs a heart; the moderate, pro-European Conservatives. As much as I dislike the direction of the Conservative party, I have found it interesting learning about the few Tories who have genuine political philosophies, rather than simply a centuries old movement to benefit only rich people.

After the Tories have systematically ripped up the manufacturing industry over the last few decades, they created the country’s wealth by being a center for world trade, and apart from the disastrous connections with a toxic American banking sector, this was fundamentally a major source of wealth coming into our country. The ironic thing is that our unique position in the European Union was the foundation to our economy, if any country couldn’t afford to give up trade treaties, it’s actually us. This is in stark contrast to the Brexiters who make up 76% of the Tory base, and a 3rd of Conservative MPs. They, like their cousins in UKIP, hate the regulations on trade which protect worker’s rights and the environment and the freedom-of-movement for European citizens. The irony is we would be better prepared for Brexit if the Tories hadn’t destroyed our manufacturing base, and now it’s the same Tories who want us to leave the main source of our countries GDP.

The ideology of right-wing, hard-Brexit campaigners, is we will continue as a country, but we’ll force those at the bottom to work longer hours, with fewer rights, on low pay; for the benefit of corporations which will only stay in the country if they are offered extreme tax breaks. My appeal to the Tories, who don’t want to see the moral fabric of society burnt at the altar of destructive neo-liberalism, is too loudly call out the absolute lunacy of their back benches, and be an ever present thorn in the side of Theresa May. I know this is going on behind closed doors in Cabinet meetings, but bringing the flawed logic and lack of a Brexit plan to the public, would greatly increase the chances we have to save the country.

Last but not least, we have Tim ‘nice but dim’ Farron. The lion who needs courage. Now, many of the Lib-Dems I know will cry “he’s the only one firmly Pro-EU!”, but it’s not brave for the Lib-Dems to take this stance. They know full well that having public support of 9% in the polls, there is no risk in coming out as fully pro-European, making that their flagship policy. And I can’t necessarily blame them; this is a “smart” move unlike Labour. But for every other policy the Lib-Dems are incredibly silent, they know having any other views in media spotlight might hold them back, or distract from their main aim. The only issue I find is that Tim is focusing all his attacks on Labour, attempting to entice disillusioned Labour supporters to the Lib-Dem ranks. I find this very strange, considering Corbyn’s Labour share far more ‘Liberal’ values then the kind of Labour moderates who support ID cards, the Snoopers Charter, and the centralization of power.

The real issue is our voting system, which divides anyone left of the Tories, leaving the Tories a majority of MPs despite only having 25% of the population voting for them. Now I understand Labour’s faults in behaving tribally, but with 27% public approval, the time is right for the Lib-Dems to start forging a progressive alliance. Tim Farron once stated directly to me, that Corbyn was too toxic to form a coalition, yet hadn’t any ammunition as to why, other then I guess Farron’s weak servitude towards a biased right-wing press. If his excuse is Corbyn’s ambivalence towards the Single Market, what better policy would it be, in bringing the parties together, if remaining in the Single Market (and proportional representation) were the foundation to any agreements? Labour moderates would love it, and so would Corbyn’s base, which on the whole favor EU market access and a better voting system. Tim Farron would have to be brave enough to extend the hand of solidarity to Labour, and promote his party’s Liberal values proudly from the rooftops to show the parties distinction from Labour and everyone else, instead of burying them, hidden, in case of media scrutiny.

It’s time to wrestle back control of this country from the minority of right-wing nutters that are hell-bent in dragging our country back to the Victorian age, economically and socially.  But it will take far more cooperation to get us back to the Britain we used to be proud of. Or…. we fight each other, risking staying in the land of Brexit Blues forever.

The Post Brexit Game of Thrones. Why we need to take control.

After a week of mourning and aggressive outbursts, combined with the removal of several friends on my Facebook, I have finally calmed down over Brexit; but the political dust storm certainly has not settled in this country, let alone the rest of the world.

I did tell a lot of people to get stuffed, and am still considering leaving a political passion for the birds, it’s consumed my parents for their entire lives, I’m not sure If I want it to do the same to me.

But now I’ve picked up my toys I threw out of the pram, and the dummy is back in place, I think now it’s important to acknowledge – in my opinion – the elephant in the room.

First let’s look at what do we know at the moment?

  1. Remain campaigners are passionately marching in London
  2. A majority of Leave voters are sticking to their guns, although 1.2 million according to Opinium online market researcher have now changed their minds.

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/brexit-news-second-eu-referendum-leave-voters-regret-bregret-choice-in-millions-a7113336.html

 

  1. The Conservatives have begun their search for a new Prime Minister, the choice is now the far right nutter, or the far far right nutter. I think we may even miss David Cameron if either May or Gove get elected. They’ve already stabbed Boris in the back, whom I sense was actually relieved to not clean up the mess he significantly helped create.
  2. Labour moderates have rebelled on mass, 170 to 40 voted a no confidence motion. But this is in stark contrast to the grass-roots, where Corbyn holds a mandate from 60% of the labour membership.
  3. And the Lib-Dems who are united, are not trying to build a progressive alliance with anyone who is “left” of the Tories, but tactically only looking to persuade Labour moderates to join their party instead. Despite the fact that Labour moderates tend to have a more authoritarian stance then liberal, which would undoubtedly create rifts with left-leaning Liberals, or radicals as they like to be known.
  4. Greens are in disarray but loosely backing Corbyn
  5. UKIP are resting on their laurels, and look a little perplexed at what to do next. Other than Farage, who is actively shouting at anyone European, and making any future negotiations increasingly difficult.

The parallels between this and HBO’s Game of Thrones is incredible, despite the lack of mythical creatures, magic, violence and incest – Although, I wouldn’t be surprised if Farage had predicted hordes of Wildlings and White Walkers were poised to invade our country during the referendum, if we didn’t vote leave.

Everyone is hopelessly divided, but all are trying to playing their cards right to gain power. I find myself completely lost on who to believe in (although this may still be post-Brexit shock). I’ve yet to understand what it feels like to get over leaving an international democracy, mainly because we haven’t bloody left it yet. Unfortunately I think we have too; not because we may want to in the end, but because the Europeans have had enough of us faffing around, whilst there are serious global issues to address.

I’m not tribal with political parties, I believe more in principles like a publically run education system, nationalised healthcare, and energy. I like the idea of a basic income, a fair taxation system (which doesn’t only benefit the super-rich), and a high minimum wage. Despite these socialist ideals, I believe absolutely in the liberal values of privacy, competitive free markets outside of what I’ve stated, and the ability to work towards higher paid work. I chose Corbyn’s labour because this is the closest to me realizing what I believe in, although I’m increasingly disenfranchised from all parties who talk little about their belief systems, and more about electability.

The “elephant in the room” I’ve alluded to earlier is about devolving power, and allowing us a proportional democracy, rather than the archaic voting system we have at the moment. This isn’t a system that enough people, and most importantly politicians, are talking about at the moment. The Conservatives know that they cannot rule as a majority in this system, this is their secret weapon to keep power, and why they called a referendum in the first place – for fear of UKIP taking votes off them in a general election.  The problems with Labour are the same; they can never form a majority without First-Past-The-Post, and this is why they fear Jeremy Corbyn, who has rallied a significant left wing movement in the country, but not enough to win a majority either.

Although I think a lot of our problems with inequality, poverty, and austerity started with Thatcher in the 80’s, I would like to take aim at Blair’s government. They had a chance to bring in proportional representation whilst in power, and they didn’t to try to keep power to themselves. Under this system, less than 30% of the electorate are ever happy with their parliament representatives. I believe this is fundamentally why people voted to Leave the European Union, not because they had any genuine, tangible issues with international democracy, but because they thought for once their vote would count for something.

The media and the public talk about the rise in the radical left wing, and right wing politics in the world – Corbyn and Farage in the UK, Trump and Sanders in the States for example. But what do these “democracies” have in common? They both have a system which only represents a small minority of voters; people are forced to vote for the least, worst option; the lesser of two evils. This system quite often leads to a concentration of power. And this concentration of power allows big business and the ultra-wealthy to dictate government policies using their financial influence.

What people fundamentally don’t understand about the European Union, is that the system was proportional. Our (proportionally) elected MEP’s, formed coalitions with other MEP’s across the union, parties had to compromise on their views to put through legislations created by the Commission. Our system in the British national government is more like an elected monarchy – the Cabinet decide legislations and policies, and the whip makes sure every MP in the party votes with them. Those that rebel have to gamble whether their decision will hold them back from any promotion. You may cite Corbyn as being a contradiction to this (the man who rebelled  428 times since being elected as an MP) but look what his own party currently think of his values.  Tory rebels also tend to be ousted quickly, disloyalty is punished without mercy. Those that follow the whip, fearing retribution, don’t even have to turn up to any debates or meetings. You ever wonder why the chambers always seem so empty?. Despite the fact we elect 650 MP’s who are meant to campaign on our behalf?

Of course there are exceptions to the rule, but what is clear from the referendum is not whether being a member of the European Union is an issue, but more that our own national government just isn’t working.  I was shocked to hear a prominent Labour representative of the South West, that I needed to put my principles in a box, that I and many others were sacrificing power, and we didn’t believe in a Labour government. He was right in one thing; I don’t necessarily believe that this country needs a Labour government, it really isn’t about which party is in power. What this country needs is a redistribution of wealth, well-funded public services, social mobility and the liberty to live a healthy, happy and fulfilling life; and I will support a party, whether Labour or someone else, that is dedicated to this

We need to talk less about the people we put in power, and more about how we can further empower people.

*If you want more information about Proportional Representation, check out this awesome video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l8XOZJkozfI